OpenCamp: Death of WordCamp Dallas

By | Internet Lawyer | No Comments

Dallas WordCamp has died an untimely and utterly unnecessary death. Instead of the annual event devoted exclusively to WordPress, this year’s event will be OpenCamp. At OpenCamp, Joomla and Drupal will also be covered.

Frankly, I’m concerned that OpenCamp isn’t inclusive enough.

Why isn’t OpenCamp covering Frog CMS, Umbraco, Mambo, ocPortal, Magnolia, XOOPS, etc. If open source content management systems are now the theme, let’s include everyone.

Why not broaden the camp to include open source operating systems too?

Yes, I’m yanking your chain.

OpenCamp is a bad concept based upon the false premise that it is too costly to run the annual two-day event as WordCamp exclusively for WordPress bloggers and designers.

I understand and appreciate the work involved with coordinating and setting up such an event. Yet there are two fundamentally mistaken assumptions made by the organizers when they made their decision to turn this into a techie Kum ba yah fest.

First, the organizers mistakenly assumed that jacking up ticket prices was the way to raise revenue to meet expenses. In reality, the costs could have easily been met (and exceeded) by sponsorships and running the event like Ken McCarthy’s System Seminar. If you’re unfamiliar with the concept, System Seminar speakers must deliver valuable content to the attendees and at the end are permitted a couple of minutes to make a pitch (some don’t). The event organizer takes a cut of each sale made. This is not a pitchfest. Deliver value. Sell something at the end. Split the profits.

Secondly, there is a mistaken belief that all prior WordCamp expenses were necessary. A speaker’s dinner, bowling party, ASL interpreters, funding for speaker travel, etc. are all nice things to have but they can be cut if it means keeping the event as a WordCamp rather than EverythingCamp.

I’d like to thank the WordCamp organizers for the past two years for providing value to attendees. Your hard work was appreciated. Killing WordCamp and replacing it with this atrocity is nuts. Let the other CMS groupies have their own separate events rather than bastardizing this one.

Let’s hope that Matt Mullenweg and his new WordPress Foundation will host a WordCamp Dallas in the future. If you want to attend a WordCamp in another location, here’s a link to the WordCamp schedule.

Should WordPress.com be Liable for Blog Content?

By | Internet Lawyer | No Comments

blog censorshipA Brazilian judge may impose a ban against access to all WordPress.com blogs because a single blogger posted an adult content video. In order to block access to the offending blog, because of the identical IP address, it might be necessary to deny access to all WordPress.com blogs. You can read the details at “Brazil: Bloggers united against WordPress ban.”

In her post “WordPress.com Banned Again: Why Aren’t You Concerned?”, Lorelle VanFossen raises two issues:

(1) the apparent lack of blogger interest in fighting such bans; and

(2) to what extent WordPress.com as a whole should be responsible for the misconduct of a single blogger.

Let me tackle these issues separately.

1. Free Speech.

From a U.S. citizen’s point of view, an ideal world would have Read More

The Blog Has Died — Long Live The Blog

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My blog died — temporarily as the feed got messed up accidentally while performing a major upgrade this weekend after installing WordPress v. 2.5 (the WP install was actually the easiest part). What you see here now is the revived version.

Key changes include:

  • a crisper layout
  • easier navigation
  • a useful resources section
  • a simplified categories list
  • ways to subscribe to the blog by RSS feed and e-mail

What do you think? Read More

WordPress Blogging at WordCamp Dallas 2008

By | Internet Lawyer | No Comments

wordcamp wordpress dallasThe second day of WordCamp Dallas 2008 is wrapping up. In addition to learning more from a tech standpoint, including some good SEO tips, the event provided an opportunity to get into the mindset of bloggers of all skill levels and many motives for blogging.

One of the amusing things is how many bloggers are doing it strictly for the fun of it, i.e. with no monetary incentives. Even those who are attempting to monetize their blogs, seem to be coming up short in the ways to do it. From the school of hard knocks, I’ve learned that there are far better ways to generate income with your blog than Google AdSense or as an Amazon Associate (affiliate).

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