Do You Need To Replace Your Customer Testimonials?

By | Internet Lawyer, Website Lawyer | No Comments

Just because you received a great customer testimonial doesn’t mean you should be using it forever to promote your business.

Sometimes a testimonial becomes stale because circumstances have changed.

For example, the claims the customer made in the testimonial are no longer true.

Or the product/service you sold the customer is no longer effective because of new technology or some other intervening factor.

Now if a testimonial becomes stale, it could become a fraudulent or deceptive marketing practice to continue using it.

So, what’s the solution?

Review your customer testimonials at least once a year to see if they’re still fresh or have gotten stale.

If there is something wrong, the first thing to decide is whether the testimonial can be salvaged by updating it.

Of course, if this is the case, contact the customer and ask them to modify the testimonial so that it’s accurate today.

Naturally, if you can’t salvage the testimonial, you’ll want to get rid of it. If feasible, request that the customer provide a new testimonial and explain why it’s necessary to replace the old one.

Customer testimonials is just one of many issues analyzed by Internet Business Lawyer Mike Young when he performs a website legal compliance review to help protect clients from civil lawsuits and government investigations.

Time To Sell Some Online Business Assets?

By | Internet Lawyer | No Comments

Like a brick-and-mortar company, an online business accumulates assets that it rarely or never uses.

If you’ve been online for more than a couple of years, chances are your e-commerce company is sitting on these types of assets.

Now’s a good time to take an inventory of what your Internet business owns and decide what you don’t and won’t need in the future.

Of course, these assets can be sold piecemeal (e.g., domain name registrations).

However, you’ll often discover a part of your company can that be spun off and sold as its own microbusiness. Sold together as a revenue generator, you can typically get more from a single buyer than selling off the parts separately to multiple purchasers.

Need help? Set up a phone consultation with Internet Business Lawyer Mike Young.

Has Google FLoC’d Your Website Privacy Policy?

By | Internet Lawyer, Website Lawyer, Website Legal Documents | No Comments

Google is testing a new tracking method for interest-based advertising in its Chrome Browser. It’s known as Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC).

If you own a website, it’s important that your site’s privacy policy accurately reflect how visitors are tracked and the type of data being collected…even if you’re not the one doing the collecting.

So, it’s a good idea to update your privacy policy to acknowledge visitors to your site using the Google Chrome Browser may be tracked using FLoC.

You may also want to let visitors know how they can disable FLoC tracking in their Chrome Browser. Most won’t but it’s a visitor-friendly feature that will be appreciated by those who are concerned about their personal privacy enough to read through your site’s privacy poicy.

And if you haven’t updated your privacy policy in a few years, chances are you’ll want an experienced Internet Business Lawyer to make other changes to your privacy policy to address important new laws and regulations.

Social Media Deplatforming

By | Internet Lawyer, Website Lawyer | No Comments

At the time this article is being written, the Florida state legislature is considering a bill that would fine large social media platforms up to $250,000 per day for deplatforming political candidates.

Why is this proposed law being considered?

In the past couple of years, there’s been trend of suspending or terminating the social media accounts of politicians whose views are different from those of the platform owners and their employees. Perhaps the most notorious was the case of former U.S. President Donald Trump involving his Twitter and Facebook accounts.

To be clear, there’s no First Amendment speech protection that applies to social media platforms. Those free speech rights are targeted against government censorship, not social media companies.

And it remains to be seen whether social media platforms will be able to successfully sue to strike down any federal or state government restrictions imposed on their ability to discipline political candidates.

If the Florida bill becomes law and is upheld by the courts, it sends a strong signal that one cannot censor social media to favor some political candidates at the expense of others.

It’s important to note that the proposed legislation is written is such a way that it targets only the very largest social media sites. However, that’s the camel’s nose under the tent on this issue. One can easily see it being applied in the future to small social media sites and even blogs that permit comments.

If you own a social media platform, the safest path right now is to: (1) have a set of rules for users; and (2) apply those rules uniformly to users. Don’t play favorites.

And if the rules protecting political candidates become too draconian, you may want to consider banning candidates from having accounts rather than spend a small fortune for regulatory compliance.

Don’t Let Your Domain Name Lease Expire

By | Internet Lawyer, Website Lawyer, Website Legal Documents | No Comments

I went to the URL for a local company I’ve done business with for years. The site had disappeared because they had let the domain name expire.

Fortunately, I had the owner’s cell phone number to let him know so that he could renew the domain name. But if one of his competitors had registered the domain name before he got it, that would have been a disaster.

And he doesn’t know how much business he’s lost while the site was down.

So, how did this happen?

Like many website owners, he thought that both site hosting and domain name registration were a single thing, not two separate expenses. When he recently renewed the site’s hosting plan, he failed to pay to renew the domain registration fee.

How do you avoid this fiasco? Here’s a few tips.

  • First, register your domain name for a longer period of time (e.g. 10 years).
  • Second, using a contracts manager, add a reminder for when the registration is about to expire so that you can ensure it’s timely renewed.
  • Third, set up registration for auto-renewal with auto billing. However, you can’t solely rely upon this because your payment method (e.g. credit card) may no longer be valid when the current term expires.